Topic: Oshiro 60mm 2:1 Macro lens at “2:1” on m4/3

This lens arrived in the late afternoon, two days ago. With the light failing, and the weather changeable, I had a quick session with insects I could find in the garden. Most of the shots were at f16 but I think the first was at f11. I used twin flash.

I am accustomed to working with a FOV only 6mm wide with my Olympus 4/3 & Raynox kit. The Oshiro, at “2:1” had a FOV ca 9mm wide (4:1 for full frame). It seemed to me that I was having to get exceptionally close to the subjects, although it is more to do with the lens being about two-thirds as long as the Oly rig so that the camera body and my face were closer.

The working distance at “2:1” (rough measurement) is 40mm. At “1:1” it was 50mm. For comparison, the Oly rig is 15mm and 90mm, FOV 8mm and 18mm wide, respectively. So, there is a WD advantage with the Oshiro at 2:1. Further testing is required.

I found it took me a while to get close enough without much hesitation.

The lens is for APS-C for non-macro and will also do macro on full frame. It comes in Canon EOS mount and I have been unable to find any alternatives.

The Amazon list gives the (crossed out) retail price as £950, a little higher than the highest price I found, in a quick search, for the Laowa version. In reality, the lowest price for the Oshiro lens is up to £380 less. Laowa (various blogs) seem to want to imply that this lens is a copy but it has been suggested that they have rebranded it for a different market.

The images are shown uncropped, having passed through my usual processing. Any inadequacies will be mine, as I am unpractised with the lens.

The caterpillars are Cinnabar Moth, probably second instar. The second image is of the “stamen spurs” of Roscoea auriculata (The colouration is due to flash light partly coming through the petals, unavoidable with the recessed subject). The bug is a mirid, probably Gryposcoris stysi.

Harold

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Re: Oshiro 60mm 2:1 Macro lens at “2:1” on m4/3

http://regex.info/blog/2015-02-26/2530

I get nothing like that distortion at f8 with my Oshiro, also with graph paper:

Smaller squares are 1mm wide.

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Re: Oshiro 60mm 2:1 Macro lens at “2:1” on m4/3

Hoverfly Emerging from Pupa

This is the second time this week that I was using this lens and didn’t know fully what I was capturing. (See “Wedding Feast” for the previous one).

I was finding subject to photograph at “2:1” (4:1 with crop factor). There was a gusting breeze and it was getting stronger. Then I saw a rather slender fly, probably a hoverfly, on a Blueberry leaf. It was perched on a vertical leaf, facing the inside of the bush. It was very fiddly trying to get light on it and I have to bend some of the adjacent twigs. I couldn’t understand why all this commotion has not caused the fly to leave in haste. Eventually, it started walking around but I still did not see the true situation.

On working through the images, I could see that the fly was halfway out of its pupal case. I had never observed this before so photographing it was very special. As a bonus, the pupal remains were a golden colour which shone at some angles of lighting.

All of the images have been cropped except the fourth one, which I have left to show the framing.

Olympus EM-1, Oshiro 60mm 2:1 macro at f16, twin TTL flash, hand-held.

Harold

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufiles/05/1486405.jpg

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Re: Oshiro 60mm 2:1 Macro lens at “2:1” on m4/3

Vapourer Moth Caterpillar with Stereos

I just happened to be walking past an umbellifer (carrot?) plant in my garden, carrying a scaffolding plank, as you do! I happened to notice a tiny patch of bright colours on a leaf. I grabbed my camera, with main flash on the L-bracket and a second one to hold in my hand, as is my usual practice.

This was another chance to test the Oshiro 2:1 macro lens. Using up to “2:1” (4:1 with crop factor), I got quite a few shots and the larva even kept still for some stereos.

Towards the end of the session, I noticed a lack of illumination from the second unit flash. It seemed that the batteries were flat. Only when I came to change them did I find that there were no batteries loaded. On the previous day, I had put them to charge and reload afterwards. So, I did involuntary single-flash shooting. In spite of that, I am pleased with the images.

The fringes on the setae tend to make processing look excessive, so additional care is needed.

Olympus EM-1, Oshiro 2:1 60mm macro, at f16, TTL flash, hand-held.

The stereos are crosseye.

Harold

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Re: Oshiro 60mm 2:1 Macro lens at “2:1” on m4/3

That is a hairy caterpillar!
Nice pictures, no troubles by the missing extra flashlight.

Re: Oshiro 60mm 2:1 Macro lens at “2:1” on m4/3

Minolfan wrote:

That is a hairy caterpillar!
Nice pictures, no troubles by the missing extra flashlight.

Thanks. I did optimise the angle of the single flash.

Harold