Topic: Next Generation Flash -- with LEDs?

Ran across this web page http://tesladownunder.com/LEDs.htm#100%20W%20LED and began wondering if next generation high-power flashes will be LEDs?  The page refers to super-duper-bright LED arrays available from HK-based 'baY seller topbright88.

The only question is how will the "white" light produced interact with cameras using Bayer pixel array?

the relevant technical concern is in the 'White Light" section of http://www.theledlight.com/technical1.html

I've seen those LED macro lights; anyone use one of those?

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Re: Next Generation Flash -- with LEDs?

LEDs are great. I hope we will benefit from this technology a little more soon...

Mostly in my bag ATM: Fuji X-T1, X-E2, X-E1, Leica M8, Nikon1 V1 and several lenses...
Things ON SALE!

Re: Next Generation Flash -- with LEDs?

Not sure what you mean by the next generation of flash but IMO generally flash units have got a little worse over the years.
Recycling times and power consumption have not been improved much yet the light quality has got worse with the marketing requirement of smaller lighter units.
The biggest problem with flash is the size of the light source. Smaller units, less power consumption and room for all the electronics, info panels and gimmicks mean smaller flash tubes. I hate the idea of seeing a flash unit with tiny LEDs as its light source.
If any new technology can give us slim flash units with a large light source I would be interested. These are available as continues lighting sources but that is of no interest to me. I think any serious application of LEDs will be with continues light sources, these will be of little interest to many users but if the price is right they will find a ready market for those keen to learn lighting techniques. 
Some type of miniature LED flash unit would also be of use for those who only use flash as an emergency option rather than a lighting tool and would be welcome (Even by me) as a replacement to the little on camera unit.

Re: Next Generation Flash -- with LEDs?

As I'm into a project with led at the job I feel this is a wrong direction to take. Leds are great for focussed light but spreading it out means lots of them. And then getting it even over an area becomes a nightmare fast.

Expert in non-working solutions.

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Re: Next Generation Flash -- with LEDs?

Some of us use LEDS already- recently I had to take some pictures in a hurry for an exhibition. I was doing macros, and the little cheapy flash i was using went pop and started smoking.

With nothing else to hand I used the front light from my bicycle (6 very bright LEDs....). The exposure was about 4" with the lens stopped right down which allowed me to keep moving the light around to get good modelling light for the details. Think it worked rather well:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3632/3399496620_6f335273c8.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3621/3398683527_46dca59a40.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3451/3398497817_b85b20a2da.jpg
(Macro Takumar 1:4 50mm preset on the Samsung GX10)

Re: Next Generation Flash -- with LEDs?

Microsoft has just announced two new phones, Kin One and Kin Two.  The first has 5MP camera, the second 8MP camera with 720p video capability.  Both camera phone use (!) LED Flash.

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Re: Next Generation Flash -- with LEDs?

I could be wrong here,  but I don't see this happening.    I don't think LED's are very  fast compared to flash tubes,  and although  I haven't exactly researched the latest technology,   I doubt they are power friendly compared to flash tubes.

How are you going to store a high powered spike for a device that requires very low voltage and very (relative) high current?     The peak power of a flash tube is developed BECAUSE   you can store high voltage in a capacitor  AS WELL AS   the capability  ---especially with modern capacitors--to store some fairly high peak current.

Power,  whether peak, average, or ??   is still related to the amount of voltage X  the amount of current.